Recently in the Titan Category


Early Titan Was a Cold, Hostile Place

Titan is a mysterious orange-socked moon of Saturn that is exciting to astrobiologists because it has some of the same kinds of chemicals that were precursors to life on Earth. Its atmosphere is 95 percent nitrogen, but it also has a tad bit of methane, predominantly close to the surface.

Scientists at UCL have observed how a widespread polar wind is driving gas from the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan.

A new type of methane-based, oxygen-free life form that can metabolize and reproduce similar to life on Earth has been modeled by a team of Cornell University researchers.

Simulations of Titan's Paleoclimate

We investigate the effects of varying Saturn's orbit on the atmospheric circulation and surface methane distribution of Titan.

New maps of Saturn's moon Titan reveal large patches of trace gases shining brightly near the north and south poles.

We report the first spectroscopic detection of ethyl cyanide (C2H5CN) in Titan's atmosphere, obtained using spectrally and spatially resolved observations of multiple emission lines with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter array (ALMA).

The international Cassini mission has revealed that a giant, toxic cloud is hovering over the south pole of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, after the atmosphere has cooled in a dramatic fashion.

We present spectrally and spatially-resolved maps of HNC and HC3N emission from Titan's atmosphere, obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) on 2013 November 17.

Several clues indicate that Titan's atmosphere has been depleted in methane during some period of its history, possibly as recently as 0.5-1 billion years ago. It could also happen in the future.

NASA scientists have created a new recipe that captures key flavors of the brownish-orange atmosphere around Saturn's largest moon, Titan.